How to put the changes in a motorcycle: 10 steps

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How to put the changes in a motorcycle: 10 steps
How to put the changes in a motorcycle: 10 steps
Anonim

One of the most important processes of riding a motorcycle is changing gears. It might sound like a challenge to master, but shifting gears is a really simple process. However, how you change gears will depend on whether the motorcycle is a manual transmission or a semi-automatic transmission.

Steps

Method 1 of 2: Shift Gears on a Manual Transmission

Shift Gears on a Motorcycle Step 1
Shift Gears on a Motorcycle Step 1

Step 1. Familiarize yourself with the clutch, throttle, and gear lever

The clutch is located in front of the left grip. It is responsible for transferring the torque from the engine to the transmission. The throttle is located on the right hand grip. Turning the throttle will increase the revolutions per minute of the engine to prevent the engine from stalling. The gear lever is a bar located in front of the left pedal. It is responsible for switching between speeds. Practice the following:

  • Squeeze the clutch lever, then slowly pull it out.
  • Turn the throttle toward the rear of the motorcycle ("roll into") to go faster.
  • Turn the throttle toward the front of the motorcycle ("roll out") to slow down.
  • Press the gear stick to put the motorcycle in first gear. This only works if you are in neutral or second gear, otherwise pressing the shift lever will only take you to a lower gear.
  • Move the gear stick up to get to the remaining gears. The predominant gear pattern for manual motorcycles is one down and four or five up. Neutral is between 1st and 2nd gear.
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Step 2. Start the motorcycle by squeezing the clutch, then pressing the start button

Make sure it's in the neutral position. Neutral is indicated by a green "N" light on the meter console; all new bikes come with that feature. At this point, you should be sitting in the saddle of the motorcycle.

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Step 3. Shift into first gear

Start by slowing down and then pulling the clutch all the way down. At the same time, move the shift lever into first gear by pressing down on the entire lever. Then slowly accelerate while releasing the clutch until the motorcycle begins to roll slowly. After this point, accelerate further and release the clutch completely.

Don't rush to release the clutch lever, continue to coordinate the throttle and clutch until the motorcycle moves. As the motorcycle increases speed, continue to release the clutch lever gently and slowly

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Step 4. Shift to higher speeds

When you reach enough speed to justify upshifting, roll out (decelerate) the throttle while squeezing the clutch. Place your left toes under the derailleur peg, lift the peg as high as you can. You can continue moving at higher speeds by pushing the gear stick up further. One increase goes to second gear, another to third, another to fourth, and so on. NOTE: An experienced driver does not need to use the clutch to shift. You just lift the shifter slightly with your foot and then when you lower the throttle, the next higher gear will be engaged. Doing it smoothly takes a bit of practice, saves time for shifting, and also slightly increases the life of the clutch plates.

  • If you are in first gear and you lift halfway, you will be in neutral.
  • If you release the clutch and turn the throttle and nothing happens, you are in neutral, squeeze the clutch and lift again.
  • If you accidentally skip a speed, don't worry. It will not damage the bike, as long as you make sure to match the throttle with the speed at which you shifted.
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Step 5. Go down to a lower speed

It rolls out ("decelerates") the accelerator while squeezing the clutch. Push in the gearshift peg and then release it. Gently adjust the clutch and throttle together to match the speed at which you travel. If you are going to stop, stop accelerating, hold down the clutch, and continue pressing and releasing the gear lever until you are in first gear.

Method 2 of 2: Shift Gears on a Semi-Automatic Transmission

Shift Gears on a Motorcycle Step 6
Shift Gears on a Motorcycle Step 6

Step 1. Learn the necessary controls

All you need to do to change gears on a motorcycle with a semi-automatic transmission is rev the engine and use the gear stick. In a semiautomatic, the clutch is tied to the shift lever, so using the gearshift activates both controls at the same time.

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Step 2. Start the motorcycle

Mount the motorcycle and make sure it is in neutral before proceeding to change gears.

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Step 3. Shift into first gear

This is a very basic process, as all you will have to do is rev the engine and press a click on the gear lever. The first gear is always found by moving the gear lever down in one slot, while the remaining gears are reached by moving the gear lever up.

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Step 4. Shift to higher speeds

To do this, use the same process of downshifting. Rev up the engine and push the speed up with your toe. Push with a click to move it to second, giving it another will change to third and so on.

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Step 5. Lower at lower speeds

To slow down and eventually come to a stop, you can downshift at lower speeds by pressing down on the gear lever. Always put the bike in neutral when you stop.

Advice

  • Motorcycles demand 100% of your attention 100% of the time. Learn to use all the controls from muscle memory by "playing" with the bike in a safe place.
  • When the light turns green, look left and right one more time to make sure no one is "trying to pass a yellow light." Passing a driver on a red light can turn a great day into a not so great one.
  • The easiest way to stay out and avoid motorcycle accidents is to identify the problem long before you reach it, or long before it reaches you.
  • Go up or down once equals one speed. You can't go from first gear to fifth by holding the shift peg up. It must be reset for every up or down shift.
  • When you are at very high speed, brake on the front brakes gently at first and then progressively harder until you have slowed down to the speed you wanted and then release the brake pressure gently.
  • When the engine is cold, do not fully press the throttle, as you could damage the engine. Let it warm up first!
  • When you take the motorcycle out on the street or on the highways, keep your eyes up, looking for problems on the road where you travel. Look in the rearview from time to time looking for people who do not see you.
  • Modern motorcycles rely on the front brake to stop. Using the rear brake at high speed has very little effect.
  • Get in the habit of slowing down while the tires are spinning. Sometimes when the motorcycle comes to a stop, the "teeth" on the gears line up in a position that makes it impossible to slow down until you release the clutch.
  • If your motorcycle does not have this feature, you will need to develop a "feel" for the gearshift peg.
  • Visibility vests are very important to wear when you start riding a motorcycle, especially at night when it can be difficult for other drivers to see you.
  • Most motorcycles have a manual transmission. This means that the clutch should be used to disengage the transmission every time you want to get the bike to move, every time you want to stop the bike, and every time you change gears.
  • Some modern motorcycles have a digital display on the speedometer console that will show how fast you are going.
  • The first speed is the hardest part to learn perfectly; release the clutch and turn the throttle at the same time and at a slow interval. If you release the clutch fast and accelerate, the bike will jump forward and do a wheelie, causing an accident.
  • Keep your knuckles pointed skyward, especially for beginners, as you don't want to accelerate the bike too much in first gear.
  • Always stay in first gear when waiting at a traffic light. Have an escape route and check your rearview from time to time while waiting for the green light. If something bad happens behind you, speed up and go!

Warnings

  • When you speed up, listen to the engine. If it is making a very serious noise, slow down. If it's a high-pitched noise, speed up.
  • When you slow down, only shift one at a time.
  • When shifting into neutral from first gear, be sure to release the clutch slowly to make sure it's really in neutral. Releasing the clutch quickly while still running will cause the bike to stall (at best) or jump forward unexpectedly.
  • If you do not speed up when the engine reaches the rev limiter, the engine could explode over time.
  • If the gears "click" a bit, try experimenting with the injector settings until you find the right one.

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