How to write a cause and effect essay (with pictures)

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How to write a cause and effect essay (with pictures)
How to write a cause and effect essay (with pictures)
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A cause and effect essay requires you to examine a particular situation or event and determine a causal relationship. Start by choosing a certain topic. Then do your preliminary research and take notes so you can incorporate them into your essay. When you're done researching, create an outline based on your thesis statement and write an initial draft. Edit the draft carefully and ask someone else to review it.

Steps

Part 1 of 3: Prepare to Write

Create Good Study Habits for Exams Step 10
Create Good Study Habits for Exams Step 10

Step 1. Make a note of the assignment details

Carefully write down any assignment requirements the teacher has provided. If you have an assignment sheet be sure to review it very carefully and write down any questions you have. At the very least, you should know the due date, the length of the assignment, the formatting requirements, and the opening message.

If you write the details on your own, be sure to keep this piece of paper in a safe location, as you will need to review it during the writing process

Ask Better Questions Step 2
Ask Better Questions Step 2

Step 2. Understand the purpose of the assignment

Cause and effect trials do not always cover both elements. Find out if the essay is required to focus on causes, effects, or a little of both. You will also need to determine if you are required to explore the assigned topic or to come up with one on your own.

For example, you may be asked to write about the causes of the American Revolution, which means that you will have to talk about the tax protests and other contributing factors. Also, you may be asked to write about the effects of the American Revolution, which means that you will have to talk about nation building and other short-term and long-term effects. A combined cause and effect trial will include both angles

Mentally Prepare for a Speech Step 1
Mentally Prepare for a Speech Step 1

Step 3. Shorten (or broaden) the topic

If you need to choose your own topic, it's a good idea to start brainstorming. Write down all the topics that cross your mind. Pick the five topics that interest you the most. Consider how much information you can reasonably include taking into account the intended length of the document. Try to divide a potential topic into several parts and choose one.

  • Consider writing about moments that you are familiar with, such as events that have impacted your life. For example, you can talk about a period of the war that you have lived through. You can also choose a controversial topic, such as the proven effects of eating junk food frequently. Taking a historical angle to view events like the American Revolution is another possible method.
  • Be flexible in adjusting the breadth or depth of the topic as you work through your essay. At any point in the process, you may need to add or remove particular discussions to meet the requirements. For example, if you write about George Washington's actions during the American Revolution, you may need to narrow your focus and discuss only one particular decision he made.
Publish a Research Paper Step 8
Publish a Research Paper Step 8

Step 4. Read any assigned text

If your teacher assigned you articles or books for your essay, it's a good idea to start reading them as soon as you can. They are likely to help you shorten or understand the topic that has been assigned to you. You can also use your text notes as evidence when you start writing the essay.

File a Civil Rights Complaint Step 9
File a Civil Rights Complaint Step 9

Step 5. Conduct a background investigation

Check out sources (books, articles, etc.) that explore the topic from a variety of perspectives. Initially, build a wide web by reading everything you can. Shorten your search as you find useful information. Be sure to take careful notes as you research so that you can cite appropriately and avoid plagiarism.

If you write about a recent topic, such as the effects of junk food production, you may be able to use first-hand information, also known as primary sources, in your work

Deal With a Bad Grade Step 5
Deal With a Bad Grade Step 5

Step 6. Ask the teacher questions

If you have questions at any stage of the process, you should write an email to the teacher (if possible) or speak with him after class. It is a good idea to write the questions in advance. You can also talk to students who have worked with this teacher before to see if they can help you understand the assignment well.

A good question might be "Is there a minimum number of sources for this assignment?" Just make sure the question you ask is not answered on the assignment sheet

Part 2 of 3: Build the Initial Essay

Write a Column Step 13
Write a Column Step 13

Step 1. Develop a thesis statement

After you've reviewed your notes, you'll need to create a thesis statement or argument to guide your essay. This is what you will try to prove throughout the trial. The thesis must be debatable and must be supported by the facts that you discovered during the investigation.

  • A thesis statement can consist of a single sentence or several, depending on what you need to include. It cannot be a quote, a basic statement of fact, or a question.
  • As you try to build your thesis statement, it can be helpful to consider what the evidence you've gathered on the topic indicates. What causes and effects are clearly illustrated in your sources? For example, if a good number of your sources talk about stock market problems as a cause of the Great Depression, then you can argue that "In part, the instability of the stock market led to the Great Depression."
Write a Comedy Sketch Step 8
Write a Comedy Sketch Step 8

Step 2. Create an outline

Identify at least three general themes or ideal that can support your main thesis. These topics will become separate sections of the body of work. Then, you will place smaller or more detailed ideas or concepts under these larger “umbrella” ideas. In the end, every piece of the organization must contribute to the thesis in some way.

  • Be very flexible with the initial outline, as you will find areas that you will need to expand or cut when you start writing.
  • It may seem easy at first, but you should never limit yourself to the five-paragraph essay format, unless your teacher specifically asks you to do so. Otherwise, feel free to add additional paragraphs, up to the page limit, to create a stronger argument.
Write a College Admissions Essay Step 8
Write a College Admissions Essay Step 8

Step 3. Make a solid introduction

The introduction is the first paragraph of the essay and is very important. You need to grab the reader's attention, you need to show them the general topic, and you need to introduce them to the thesis statement, usually in the last sentence (or the last two). In the case of a cause and effect trial, you should try to clarify whether you plan to include both areas or just one.

You can get the reader interested in your topic by initially including a precise quote, an interesting source, or a short anecdote. Just keep this part short. The introduction should be a very short paragraph compared to the body

Write to CCOT Essay Step 2
Write to CCOT Essay Step 2

Step 4. Write the body paragraphs

This part is where you develop the schematic. Each paragraph must include a particular element of the argument. In the cause portion of the essay, you will need to explain the event in question and make initial connections for the effect portion below. In the effect portion, you will have to explain to the reader how you get from point A (the cause) to point B (the effect).

Don't forget to add at least one paragraph that explains to the reader why connections are important to him on an individual or group level. You can use this paragraph as an opportunity to make an educated statement about what the implications of this cycle of cause and effect will be. Essentially, what is the importance?

Write to CCOT Essay Step 4
Write to CCOT Essay Step 4

Step 5. Emphasize the time frame of cause and effect

As you progress through the body paragraphs, be sure to emphasize the fact that the cause you address occurred before the effect. Also, as you write about the effect, make sure you can prove what happened after the particular cause. You should avoid a situation in which causes and effects are so intertwined that they are not causally related.

For example, if you argue that the Great Depression caused a rise in unemployment, you will need to have statistics to support this view. After all, unemployment existed before and after the event in question, so the causal relationship is what needs to be clarified

Write to CCOT Essay Step 7
Write to CCOT Essay Step 7

Step 6. Acknowledge or rule out other explanations

You must convince readers that you are aware of alternative arguments or approaches. Don't overdo it as you describe the cause and effect relationship. Instead, use the evidence to show that even if there are other causes or effects, the most important causal relationship is the ones you found in your work.

For example, if you write about the causes of the Great Depression, you will have to talk about the stock market, but also about the income gap. If you decide to focus only on the relationship between the Great Depression and the stock market, then somewhere in the essay you will have to acknowledge the other possible causes and simultaneously indicate that you chose this particular approach

Write a Book Quickly Step 7
Write a Book Quickly Step 7

Step 7. Come up with a strong conclusion

Use the concluding paragraph to summarize your thesis and main supporting points. Keep it short, though, as this paragraph should be nearly the same length as the introduction. You can also make some indication of how your findings may change in the future if conditions or interpretations are altered in any way.

Present a Science Project Step 12
Present a Science Project Step 12

Step 8. Collate specific details and general statements

Throughout the body paragraphs you will develop and present natural combinations of detailed evidence and general summaries or interpretive observations. Without the details the essay will be too vague. Without interpretive comments, the reader will see a list of facts without any analysis.

Part 3 of 3: Polish the Final Draft

Get Boring Homework Done Step 10
Get Boring Homework Done Step 10

Step 1. Set it aside

When you've finished the first draft of the essay, set it aside for a short time. Waiting to review a day or two is ideal, although it may not be possible if you have a deadline. Distracting yourself from the essay is beneficial because it allows you to return to it with a fresh perspective. You will see errors and areas of expansion that you had not considered before.

This is another reason why it is best not to put off writing such an essay. You will need enough time to patiently complete the process to create your best possible work

Write a Conflict of Interest Statement Step 14
Write a Conflict of Interest Statement Step 14

Step 2. Ask a friend to read it

As soon as you know that you will need to write an essay, it is a good idea to go to a friend or classmate and ask them to spend a little time reviewing the draft. Before giving him the draft, it's a good idea to let him know if there are any particular “problem areas” that you would like him to focus on.

You can say, "Please focus on the choice of words, as this is one of my weaknesses."

Write a Book Quickly Step 18
Write a Book Quickly Step 18

Step 3. Read and review the work one more time

After you get away from work for a bit and have someone else review it, you will need to begin the personal review process. Find a quiet place where you can sit and read the essay word for word. Try to identify the big and small problems, and make these changes.

Some people find it helpful to print the essay at this point and make the revisions on a hard copy. This action can also protect you in the event that you experience a problem with your computer

Write a College Admissions Essay Step 2
Write a College Admissions Essay Step 2

Step 4. Pay attention to transitions

When writing an essay with a “split” topic (such as one containing comparison and contrast, or cause and effect) it is especially important to make the transitions clear and obvious to the reader. This will make the reader understand that you are moving from one area to another. Words for good transitions include "therefore", "consequently", "thus" and many others.

Advice

  • Sometimes it is helpful to read your essay aloud while editing. This action will allow you to find errors that you may have missed.
  • If the teacher is willing to review the first draft, you should ask him to do so.

Warnings

  • Be very careful not to plagiarize or abide by any kind of academic ethics. Make your own work and ask the teacher for help, if you need it.
  • Make sure to save your work as you go. Computer problems happen and you don't want to lose your job as a result.

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